living materials
material research
2015 (ongoing)



living material

Getting out of your comfort zone can reveal new ways and opportunities.
This happened when I first came in touch with living material. I started experimenting with fungi, bacteria, kombucha and plants after an internship at Mediamatic in Amsterdam.


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kombucha masterculture

kombucha

I experimented with a Kombucha culture to produce cellulose out of sugar, tea and a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast.
The Kombucha produces an even layer of cellulose on top of its habitat which can be taken off after a certain time.


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sheet of cellulose cellulose floating in water

material

After sterilization it can be dried. It shrinks down to 1/10 of its thickness as it consists of 90% water. It becomes a strong transparent material that may be used as packaging material or even paper.


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kombucha food packaging

fungi

I came across the potential usage of fungi as organic material, waste degenerator and food source. This can tackle current issues like massiv waste production, unsustainable production or environmental pollution.


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kombucha food packaging

working with fungi

I worked in a lab at Stichting Mediamatic and cultivatied different species of fungi together with a professional Mycologist.
Currently I am woring on a workshop and an instructed starter kit at Kitchen Budapest.


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reishi sterile work

material

I did material experiments with the fungal species Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) and Pleurotus Ostreatus (Oyster mushroom).
The fungal mycelium can be grown on waste and can be used as isolation or packaging material.


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mycelium reishi

living_materials_moods.mp4